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Wild Dagga Spray (Leonotis Leonurus) 50 ml.

Wild Dagga Spray (Leonotis Leonurus) 50 ml.

R 100.00

What is Wild Dagga (Leonotis Leonurus)? 


Recreational Uses
 

Wild Dagga is smoked or made into a medicinal tea by the Khoikhoi (Hottentots) a tribe of South Africa. Wild Dagga is good for inducing a deep meditative sleep, calming, relaxing and enhancing dreaming. Because of its euphoric effects, Wild Dagga is often referred to as a Cannabis substitute.

Leonotis leonurus (Wild Dagga, Lion's Tail) species is also used in Eastern medicine as euphoriant, purgative, and vermifuge.

Wild Dagga also has a pleasant smell that can be used for incense.

 


Medicinal Uses

Newstar-Chem pharmaceutical company asserts possible applications: (poorly translated via their website.) "treated the menstruation which was irregular, the uterine hemorrhage and the dysmenorrhea etc;The animal experimentation also indicated that the product could the increase the peripheral vascular ,the coronary artery and the cardiac muscle nutrition,increased the hematic flux,improved the micro circulation,and had the antithrombus to form".

In most common uses the leaves are picked, dried, and then brewed as a tea.

One experimental animal study suggest that "the aqueous leaf extract of L. leonurus possesses antinociceptive, antiinflammatory, and hypoglycemic properties, and thus lend pharmacological credence to the suggested folkloric uses of the herb in the management and/or control of painful, arthritic, and other inflammatory conditions, as well as for adult-onset, type-2 diabetes mellitus in some communities of South Africa.".

Dosage:

(internal use) Adults: Half a cupful (.90ml) Elderly patients: Quarter of a cupful (.45ml) Children 6-12 yrs: Quarter of a cupful (.45ml) Children 2-6 yrs: Two teaspoonsful (.8ml) To be taken two to three times daily. For external use, the decoction may be applied to the affected area using a clean cloth. References 1. Iwarsson, M. (1985). Leonotis, in Flora of Southern Africa 28,4: 31-37. Botanical Research Institute, Pretoria


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